Nieuws

Op 24 april jl werd in Karachi een bekende mensenrechtenactiviste, Sabeen Mehmud, doodgeschoten. Zij kwam juist van een bijeenkomst vandaan waar gesproken was over de mensenrechtensituatie in Baluchistan, waar al tijden fel gedemonstreerd wordt voor meer autonomie en een groter aandeel in de natuurlijke rijkdom van de provincie. De moordenaars zijn onbekend. Deze keer was het geweld  niet speciaal tegen de Christenen gericht zoals kort geleden in Lahore, maar tegen een persoon die zich inzette voor  alle bewoners van Baluchistan. Voor Friends of Al-Falah reden genoeg om zich te blijven inzetten voor jongeren, die met een goede opleiding kunnen meewerken aan een algemene verbetering van de situatie in Baluchistan.


Dit artikel uit de New York Times van februari 2015 geeft een goed beeld van de situatie waarin de Pakistaanse Christenen zich bevinden

Written by Ali Sethi, Lahore-Pakistan

Last Monday, this city was briefly overrun with bands of sloganeering, stick-wielding youths. The demonstrators threw stones at police officers, burned car tires and smashed windows. One gang even plundered a 7Up truck, guzzling its goods before transfixed TV cameras. (I watched the footage — slow-motions of sparkly liquid, with strains of horror movie music playing in the background — that night on the Internet.) There was a euphoric edge to the riots, apparent even when they took a grotesquely violent turn with the lynching of two men. Who were these vandals? And what, if anything, did their actions demonstrate? If you went by the original news bulletins, they were Christians reacting to a suicide bombing the day before of two churches in Youhanabad, a low-income area of Lahore that is home to some 100,000 Christians. A faction of the Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which killed 15 people and injured dozens. The rioters' anger was directed at Pakistan's state and society, which had repeatedly failed to protect them from Islamist extremists. According to one estimate, in the last two years there have been 36 targeted attacks on Pakistani Christians, 265 Christian deaths from suicide bombings and 21 "persecutions" of Christians under Pakistan's blasphemy law. To their credit, several TV anchors ran heart-rending montages of recent incidents in which Muslim mobs or terrorists had shot, bombed or burned Pakistani Christians. But by last Tuesday the conversation had changed, after it was established that the two men lynched by the Christian mob were blameless Muslims who happened to be near the churches when the explosions took place. (Police officers had appréhended the men on suspicion of abetting the bombers, but quickly gave them up to the rioters.) The news of their innocence gave the debates a kind of retributive equilibrium, allowing Muslim politicians to spar with Christian leaders about the other community's excesses before rolling out their convenient conclusions: All of Pakistan was under threat from Islamist terrorists, even if religious minorities were especially vulnerable; the attack on the Christians was no different from attacks on Shiites and Ahmadis, two sects that have also been targeted by hard-line Sunni groups. The message — that the bombing of two churches was no big deal in this war-torn country — was not lost on anyone. But Pakistani Christians have a strong claim to being the country's most anciently marginalized group, their predicament made all the more intractable by the silence that surrounds it.This silence is not just about religion; it is also about caste. Most of Pakistan's 2.8 million Christians are descended from low-caste tribes converted by Anglican and Catholic missionaries during the period of British rule. Dwelling mainly in Punjab Province, these tribes were associated with menial occupations such as sweeping and carcass collection, and had for centuries borne the corresponding stigmas of ritual pollution and "untouchability." By converting to Christianity — so the missionaries claimed — these long-oppressed peoples were embracing a life of salvation and dignity. (It is true that attachment to the church could enable access to education and the resources of the colonial state, and thereby bring about qualitative changes in the Jives of farmer "untouchables," many of whom took on Anglo-Saxon names to consolidate their new identities.) But the creation of Pakistan in 1947 —and its subsequent slide into the exclusionary politics of religion — has proved disastrous for the Christians' security. Unlike in India, where the pressures of representative government and an ostensibly secular polity have offered some protection to disenfranchised castes, Pakistan's undemocratic state has never accepted caste as a legitimate political category, preferring to use religion as an all-encompassing tool for mobilization. This has helped its dictators and autocrats amass power — prolonging their tenures, stilling dissent and building nuclear bombs. But it has undermined the country's most vulnerable community twofold: Pakistani Christians have both lost their claim to caste-based affirmative action and acquired the hazardous, Taliban-baiting title of a "religious minority." What we have, then, is the peculiar despair of a people who are unable to articulate their real grievance, a people who have no political parties or voting blocs of their own, who have only churches and pastors and the eternal motifs of suffering and deliverance to see them through this dark period. To live in present-day Pakistan is to know all this in one's bones. It is to recognize a welter of prejudices related to the word "Christian," with its caste associations of waste and blood and a rarely acknowledged but ingrained sense of primordial difference. Indeed, it is to know a long-buried secret about this "Islamic" country, a secret about how religion is used to paper over caste, class and political tensions that threaten, with ever-growing frequency, to rupture the fabric of its society. Last week's riots, which were instigated by a religious attack, brought a long-oppressed community's fury to the fore. In that sense they are a sign of things to come. Anyone walking the streets of Pakistan would do well to remember that. When Pakistani Christians fight back By Ali Sethi LAHORE, PAKISTAN Last Monday, this city was briefly overrun with bands of sloganeering, stick-wielding youths. The demonstrators threw stones at police officers, burned car tires and smashed windows. One gang even plundered a 7Up truck, guzzling its goods before transfixed TV cameras. (I watched the footage — slow-motions of sparkly liquid, with strains of horror movie music playing in the background — that night on the Internet.) There was a euphoric edge to the riots, apparent even when they took a grotesquely violent turn with the lynching of two men. Who were these vandals? And what, if anything, did their actions demonstrate? If you went by the original news bulletins, they were Christians reacting to a suicide bombing the day before of two churches in Youhanabad, a low-income area of Lahore that is home to some 100,000 Christians. A faction of the Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which killed 15 people and injured dozens. The rioters' anger was directed at Pakistan's state and society, which had repeatedly failed to protect them from Islamist extremists. According to one estimate, in the last two years there have been 36 targeted attacks on Pakistani Christians, 265 Christian deaths from suicide bombings and 21 "persecutions" of Christians under Pakistan's blasphemy law. To their credit, several TV anchors ran heart-rending montages of recent incidents in which Muslim mobs or terrorists had shot, bombed or burned Pakistani Christians. But by last Tuesday the conversation had changed, after it was established that the two men lynched by the Christian mob were blameless Muslims who happened to be near the churches when the explosions took place. (Police officers had appréhended the men on suspicion of abetting the bombers, but quickly gave them up to the rioters.) The news of their innocence gave the debates a kind of retributive equilibrium, allowing Muslim politicians to spar with Christian leaders about the other community's excesses before rolling out their convenient conclusions: All of Pakistan was under threat from Islamist terrorists, even if religious minorities were especially vulnerable; the attack on the Christians was no different from attacks on Shiites and Ahmadis, two sects that have also been targeted by hard-line Sunni groups. The message — that the bombing of two churches was no big deal in this war-torn country — was not lost on anyone. But Pakistani Christians have a strong claim to being the country's most anciently marginalized group, their predicament made all the more intractable by the silence that surrounds it.This silence is not just about religion; it is also about caste. Most of Pakistan's 2.8 million Christians are descended from low-caste tribes converted by Anglican and Catholic missionaries during the period of British rule. Dwelling mainly in Punjab Province, these tribes were associated with menial occupations such as sweeping and carcass collection, and had for centuries borne the corresponding stigmas of ritual pollution and "untouchability." By converting to Christianity — so the missionaries claimed — these long-oppressed peoples were embracing a life of salvation and dignity. (It is true that attachment to the church could enable access to education and the resources of the colonial state, and thereby bring about qualitative changes in the Jives of farmer "untouchables," many of whom took on Anglo-Saxon names to consolidate their new identities.) But the creation of Pakistan in 1947 —and its subsequent slide into the exclusionary politics of religion — has proved disastrous for the Christians' security. Unlike in India, where the pressures of representative government and an ostensibly secular polity have offered some protection to disenfranchised castes, Pakistan's undemocratic state has never accepted caste as a legitimate political category, preferring to use religion as an all-encompassing tool for mobilization. This has helped its dictators and autocrats amass power — prolonging their tenures, stilling dissent and building nuclear bombs. But it has undermined the country's most vulnerable community twofold: Pakistani Christians have both lost their claim to caste-based affirmative action and acquired the hazardous, Taliban-baiting title of a "religious minority." What we have, then, is the peculiar despair of a people who are unable to articulate their real grievance, a people who have no political parties or voting blocs of their own, who have only churches and pastors and the eternal motifs of suffering and deliverance to see them through this dark period. To live in present-day Pakistan is to know all this in one's bones. It is to recognize a welter of prejudices related to the word "Christian," with its caste associations of waste and blood and a rarely acknowledged but ingrained sense of primordial difference. Indeed, it is to know a long-buried secret about this "Islamic" country, a secret about how religion is used to paper over caste, class and political tensions that threaten, with ever-growing frequency, to rupture the fabric of its society. Last week's riots, which were instigated by a religious attack, brought a long-oppressed community's fury to the fore. In that sense they are a sign of things to come. Anyone walking the streets of Pakistan would do well to remember that. When Pakistani Christians fight back By Ali Sethi LAHORE, PAKISTAN Last Monday, this city was briefly overrun with bands of sloganeering, stick-wielding youths. The demonstrators threw stones at police officers, burned car tires and smashed windows. One gang even plundered a 7Up truck, guzzling its goods before transfixed TV cameras. (I watched the footage — slow-motions of sparkly liquid, with strains of horror movie music playing in the background — that night on the Internet.) There was a euphoric edge to the riots, apparent even when they took a grotesquely violent turn with the lynching of two men. Who were these vandals? And what, if anything, did their actions demonstrate? If you went by the original news bulletins, they were Christians reacting to a suicide bombing the day before of two churches in Youhanabad, a low-income area of Lahore that is home to some 100,000 Christians. A faction of the Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which killed 15 people and injured dozens. The rioters' anger was directed at Pakistan's state and society, which had repeatedly failed to protect them from Islamist extremists. According to one estimate, in the last two years there have been 36 targeted attacks on Pakistani Christians, 265 Christian deaths from suicide bombings and 21 "persecutions" of Christians under Pakistan's blasphemy law. To their credit, several TV anchors ran heart-rending montages of recent incidents in which Muslim mobs or terrorists had shot, bombed or burned Pakistani Christians. But by last Tuesday the conversation had changed, after it was established that the two men lynched by the Christian mob were blameless Muslims who happened to be near the churches when the explosions took place. (Police officers had appréhended the men on suspicion of abetting the bombers, but quickly gave them up to the rioters.) The news of their innocence gave the debates a kind of retributive equilibrium, allowing Muslim politicians to spar with Christian leaders about the other community's excesses before rolling out their convenient conclusions: All of Pakistan was under threat from Islamist terrorists, even if religious minorities were especially vulnerable; the attack on the Christians was no different from attacks on Shiites and Ahmadis, two sects that have also been targeted by hard-line Sunni groups. The message — that the bombing of two churches was no big deal in this war-torn country — was not lost on anyone. But Pakistani Christians have a strong claim to being the country's most anciently marginalized group, their predicament made all the more intractable by the silence that surrounds it.This silence is not just about religion; it is also about caste. Most of Pakistan's 2.8 million Christians are descended from low-caste tribes converted by Anglican and Catholic missionaries during the period of British rule. Dwelling mainly in Punjab Province, these tribes were associated with menial occupations such as sweeping and carcass collection, and had for centuries borne the corresponding stigmas of ritual pollution and "untouchability." By converting to Christianity — so the missionaries claimed — these long-oppressed peoples were embracing a life of salvation and dignity. (It is true that attachment to the church could enable access to education and the resources of the colonial state, and thereby bring about qualitative changes in the Jives of farmer "untouchables," many of whom took on Anglo-Saxon names to consolidate their new identities.) But the creation of Pakistan in 1947 —and its subsequent slide into the exclusionary politics of religion — has proved disastrous for the Christians' security. Unlike in India, where the pressures of representative government and an ostensibly secular polity have offered some protection to disenfranchised castes, Pakistan's undemocratic state has never accepted caste as a legitimate political category, preferring to use religion as an all-encompassing tool for mobilization. This has helped its dictators and autocrats amass power — prolonging their tenures, stilling dissent and building nuclear bombs. But it has undermined the country's most vulnerable community twofold: Pakistani Christians have both lost their claim to caste-based affirmative action and acquired the hazardous, Taliban-baiting title of a "religious minority." What we have, then, is the peculiar despair of a people who are unable to articulate their real grievance, a people who have no political parties or voting blocs of their own, who have only churches and pastors and the eternal motifs of suffering and deliverance to see them through this dark period. To live in present-day Pakistan is to know all this in one's bones. It is to recognize a welter of prejudices related to the word "Christian," with its caste associations of waste and blood and a rarely acknowledged but ingrained sense of primordial difference. Indeed, it is to know a long-buried secret about this "Islamic" country, a secret about how religion is used to paper over caste, class and political tensions that threaten, with ever-growing frequency, to rupture the fabric of its society. Last week's riots, which were instigated by a religious attack, brought a long-oppressed community's fury to the fore. In that sense they are a sign of things to come. Anyone walking the streets of Pakistan would do well to remember that.


Nieuwsbrief van de Vrienden van Al-Falah, december 2014

Beste Vrienden van Al-Falah, Hierbij treffen jullie de 16e Nieuwbrief aan met een verslag van de activiteiten in 2014. Dit was een jaar waarin het met Pakistan nog niet veel beter is gegaan, zoals blijkt uit de geruchtmakende beroving van Mr. Edhi, één van de grootste weldoeners van het land. Maar voor Quetta was het een rustig jaar, althans rustiger dan vorig jaar. Toch is het bepaald nog niet veilig te noemen, wat zijn weerslag had op de activiteiten.

Het Al-Falah hostel en de Salesianen van Don Bosco.

Nog steeds rijden er geen schoolbussen in er worden geen middag- en avondlessen gegeven. Er zijn op het moment twintig interne en twintig externe studenten.  Al-Falah zal de komende winter gebruiken om meer jongeren van buiten Quetta aan te moedigen hun studie te vervolgen met het jongerentehuis als steun en onderdak.Zoals jullie weten is de dagelijkse leiding van de Al-Falah studenten in handen van de Salesianen van Don Bosco. Na de eerste fase van het bouwen van het gehele complex, met o.a. de school en het Al-Falah  hostel in  de afgelopen jaren door father Peter Zago, kan nu door zijn opvolger father Julio Palmieri meer tijd en aandacht aan de inhoud worden gegeven.  Zo is hij begonnen met training- en discussiebijeenkomsten voor de onderwijzers van de school en met intensievere huiswerkbegeleiding voor de studenten van Al-Falah.  De school van het Don Bosco Learning Center (DBLC) gaat tot grade 10 (matric diploma) en heeft 800 leerlingen, jongens en meisjes. Het grootste probleem voor de Salesianen blijft het gebrek aan mankracht. Pas over enkele jaren verwachten zij de eerste Pakistaanse Salesianen terug van hun opleiding in het buitenland.Het bisdom heeft aangekondigd dat ze haar bijdrage aan het Al-Falah hostel wil verminderen.  Deze bijdrage is afkomstig van de rente van het geld dat Otto Postma ofm opzij gezet had als basis voor het voortbestaan en functioneren van Al-Falah na zijn overlijden. Sinds zijn overlijden hebben de Salesianen en de `Friends` de bisschop eraan herinnerd dat dit geld gegeven is met het doel Al-Falah te steunen en dus ook daarvoor gebruikt moet worden. Ze hebben ervoor gepleit dat het beheerd zou moeten worden door de Salesianen, die de zorg dragen voor het hostel. De bisschop van Quetta gaat over anderhalf jaar met pensioen en de Salesianen zijn bang dat het bisdom onder zijn opvolger deze gelden voor andere doeleinden zal gaan bestemmen.

Al-Falah without Walls

Het AwW wil graag een eigen ruimte hebben voor haar activiteiten met daarbij een kleine ruimte voor kantoor. Op dit moment wordt het huis van Ilyas daarvoor gebruikt. De wens een eigen ruimte te hebben werd plotseling concreter toen FoA de toezegging kreeg van een gulle donor voor een bijdrage van € 5.000 als bijdrage voor de aankoop van een stuk eigen grond. Mr.William Barkat, de MPA van Baluchistan voor de christelijke minderheid, beloofde  daarop om uit overheidsfondsen de bouwkosten voor de school te betalen. De kosten voor de aankoop van een klein stuk grond zijn echter vier tot vijf maal hoger dan de genoemde bijdrage. Mr. Barkat is nu met een nieuw voorstel gekomen. Hij heeft plannen voor het stichten van een Christian Cultural Academy. Dit naar analogie  van bestaande culturele centra voor verschillende minderheidsgroepen in Quetta. Fondsen hiervoor zouden moeten komen uit de begroting van de regering van Baluchistan. Mr.Barkat heeft aangeboden binnen dit centrum een stukje grond te reserveren voor AwW en ook de bouwkosten te financieren. Het centrum zou een bibliotheek krijgen, een computer centrum, een grote hal voor bijeenkomsten die ook aan particulieren verhuurd zou kunnen worden bv voor trouwerijen. De totale kosten van het project schatte hij  op 80.000.000 Pakistaanse Rupees (ongeveer € 660.000).Mr. Barkat heeft al goedkeuring van de eerste minister en hij heeft de plannen ingediend bij het Baluchistaanse Ministerie van Cultuur.  Younus Barkat, een oud-leerling en goede vriend van wijlen father Otto, denkt dat er twee grote problemen zijn. Allereerst het telkens getoonde onvermogen van de christenen in Baluchistan om samen te werken en op de tweede plaats het bekende probleem m.b.t. het niet beschikbaar zijn of komen van fondsen voor de lopende kosten. Veel vragen over de organisatie zijn nog onbeantwoord. Dus er is nog een lange weg te gaan. Voor FoA is het nog te vroeg om een standput in te nemen. We wachten op meer duidelijkheid van Pakistaanse kant.

Studiebeurzen

Veel van de studenten, die door AwW geholpen zijn met bijlessen bij de voorbereiding op een regeringsexamen, willen graag verder studeren, maar missen de financiële middelen daarvoor. Daarom heeft FoA in 2013 een actie gestart om geld in te zamelen voor studiebeurzen. In 2014 hebben wij van verschillende instellingen en fondsen hiervoor in totaal een bedrag van Euro 33.900 ontvangen. AwW heeft in het begin van 2014 kandidaten gevraagd zich te melden. Een selectiecommissie heeft intensieve gesprekken gevoerd met alle kandidaten en 33 meisjes en jongens uitgekozen, die goede studieresultaten in het verleden hebben behaald. Ze zijn zeer gemotiveerd, maar hun ouders zijn niet in staat de kosten van een vervolgopleiding te betalen. De beurzen zijn voor MBA opleidingen aan de universiteit, voor verschillende studies op bachelor niveau en voor een aantal beroepsopleidingen o.a. voor drie meisjes en een jongen voor een opleiding voor verpleegster/verpleger. De beurzen betreffen meestal periodes van twee tot drie jaar. Tijdens zijn bezoek heeft onze voorzitter met de meeste studenten een gesprek gehad. Eén van de dingen die hem opviel was dat verschillenden van hen kort geleden getrouwd waren. Voor ouders heeft trouwen en kinderen krijgen een hogere prioriteit dan studeren. De huwelijken en de keuze van de partners  worden door de familie gearrangeerd. Voor meisjes geldt bovendien dat ze na hun huwelijk intrekken bij hun schoonfamilie en daar moeten meehelpen met alle huishoudelijke taken. De jongeren accepteren deze situatie, hoewel ze doordrongen zijn van de voordelen van een goede opleiding. Reema vertelde dat ze liever eerst haar studie had willen afmaken vóór ze trouwde, ook al vond ze de jongen met wie ze onlangs getrouwd is en zijn familie erg aardig. Voor meisjes beperken de beroepsmogelijkheden zich tot die van onderwijzeres en verpleegkundige.  Mahwish, Nabila en Sunaina volgen de vierjarige opleiding voor verpleegkunde in het Civil Hospital van Quetta. Eén jongen, Daniyal, heeft eerst drie jaar een opleiding gevolgd in het Mission Hospital en doet nu in het Civil Hospital zijn vierde jaar. Verpleegkundige is een goed betaalde, maar zware baan. John, Noman en Khuram werken op de administratie van het DBLC. Khuram heeft enkele jaren geleden al een beurs gehad voor een MBA opleiding. John en Noman krijgen nu een beurs voor een MBA opleiding. Mahwish is een van de beste leraressen van het DBLC. Reden waarom ze ook al eerder een studiebeurs kreeg. Schoolgeld, inschrijf- en andere kosten voor het onderwijs zijn hoog. De studenten vertellen over de financiële problemen thuis. Brian woont met zijn ouders, grootouders en getrouwde broer in een klein huis. Zijn opa, vader, oom en zijn oudste broer hebben ernstige gezondheidsproblemen en de laatste drie jaar was zijn vader werkeloos. Vanwege de financiële problemen thuis is Nayyar van school gegaan toen ze in grade 8 zat. Met hulp van het AwW project heeft ze toch haar matric examen kunnen doen en nu heeft ze een beurs voor een bachelor opleiding voor lerares. Ook Rabia ging van school weg toen haar moeder ziek werd en Sumbal ging van school weg door financiële problemen thuis als gevolg van de alcoholverslaving van haar vader. Met steun van het AwW project heeft ze met goed gevolg het matric examen gehaald en nu studeert ze verder aan het Government  Girls College in Quetta.

Financiële verantwoording 2014

Tot en met eind november  2014 heeft de stichting  Friends of Al-Falah  een totaalbedrag van € 72.665 aan giften ontvangen (afgerond op hele euro’s).Van stichtingen, organisaties en instellingen ontvingen we € 66.900 als volgt:
Datum Instelling Bedrag Bestemming12-3 Anoniem 20.000 Studiebeurzen25-4 Stichting Wiijocha 3.000 Proj. Al-Falah without Walls (AwW)12-5 Stichting Eerlijk Delen 2.500 Proj. Al-Falah without Walls12-5 St. Fonds voor Verpleegkundigen 900 Studiebeurzen14-5 Impulsis 2.500 Proj. Al-Falah without Walls19-5 St. Familiefonds Wierda-Baas 3.000 Studiebeurzen1-7 Stichting Marthe van Rijswijck 10.000 Studiebeurzen13-11 Anoniem 25.000 Proj. Al-Falah without Walls/studiebeurzenTotaal 66.900
De vrienden van Al-Falah hebben met hun periodieke en eenmalige giften een bedrag van € 5.765 bijeengebracht. Het bestuur wil alle gevers hartelijk danken voor hun giften waarmee we diverse projecten in Quetta konden steunen.Tot en met eind november  2014 hebben we een totaalbedrag van € 24.900  voor de volgende projecten naar Pakistan overgemaakt: 
Bestemming BedragOndersteuning jongerentehuis 6.000Project Al-Falah without Walls/studiebeurzen 18.900Totaal 24.900
Van de in 2014 ontvangen bedragen hebben we volgens de bedoeling van de anonieme gever een reservering gemaakt van € 26.000 voor het studiebeurzenprogramma 2015-2017 en een reservering van € 5.000 voor de aankoop van een terrein voor een eigen ruimte voor het AwW project.
Omwille van het voortbestaan van het Al-Falah jongerentehuis voor de gemarginaliseerde jeugd van Quetta  onder de verantwoordelijkheid van het Don Bosco Learning Center, vragen wij u wederom de financiële ondersteuning ruimhartig voort te zetten; de jongeren van het tehuis zijn u daarvoor buiten-gewoon dankbaar.
De stichting  Friends of Al-Falah is door de Belastingdienst aangemerkt als een Algemeen Nut Beogende Instelling (ANBI), zodat giften aan de stichting onder de giftenaftrek voor de inkomstenbelasting vallen.
Attentie: de bankoverstapservice loopt eind 2014 af; in verband daarmee wordt u verzocht - indien u dat nog niet deed - uw gift in 2015 over te maken naar IBAN: NL22 INGB 0006145641.Donateurs wier giften wij via incasso ontvangen hoeven geen actie te nemen. 
Voor verdere informatie over de financiën  van de stichting kunt u contact opnemen met de penningmeester, Hans Holthaus  (tel. 0314 642177).

Het bestuur van Vrienden van Al-Falah wenst alle donateurs prettige Kerstdagen en een goed en gezond 2015 toe.

Han Schellart - Hans Holthaus - Paulien de Wilde - Frank van Steenbergen - Martin Zwanenburg - Geert Edelenbosch


<< <  Pagina 2 van 8  > >>